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"Sarsfield is short, though you wouldn’t notice at a distance. He has long, slim features and talks with well-articulated confidence. He’s thin, dresses in black, and wears a sinister smile. He looks like a poet."
— Mosaic Collective

likeafieldmouse:

Holger Lippmann - Perlin Scape 1 (2011)

"The Perlin Scape 1 series is based on a perlin noise algorithm, which generates color map dependent line by line sequences of either ellipses or rectangles on a 2 dimensional surface.

This software works with different keyboard input values to compose a rather painting-like image out of different color maps. These map arrays are called by random, noise and/or manual order.”

The best advice I can offer to those heading into the world of film is not to wait for the system to finance your projects and for others to decide your fate. If you can’t afford to make a million-dollar film, raise $10,000 and produce it yourself. That’s all you need to make a feature film these days. Beware of useless, bottom-rung secretarial jobs in film-production companies. Instead, so long as you are able-bodied, head out to where the real world is. Roll up your sleeves and work as a bouncer in a sex club or a warden in a lunatic asylum or a machine operator in a slaughterhouse. Drive a taxi for six months and you’ll have enough money to make a film. Walk on foot, learn languages and a craft or trade that has nothing to do with cinema. Filmmaking — like great literature — must have experience of life at its foundation. Read Conrad or Hemingway and you can tell how much real life is in those books. A lot of what you see in my films isn’t invention; it’s very much life itself, my own life. If you have an image in your head, hold on to it because — as remote as it might seem — at some point you might be able to use it in a film. I have always sought to transform my own experiences and fantasies into cinema.
Werner Herzog

likeafieldmouse:

Gustave Caillebotte - The Floor Scrapers (1875-6)

Original on top, later version below

"Despite the effort Caillebotte put into the painting, it was rejected by France’s most prestigious art exhibition, The Salon, in 1875. The depiction of working-class people in their trade, not fully clothed, shocked the jurors and was deemed a ‘vulgar subject matter.’ 

The images of the floor scrapers came to be associated with Degas’s paintings of washerwomen, also presented at the same exhibition and similarly scorned as ‘vulgar’”.

His rule (Carl Braun’s) for all the Braun Company’s communications was called the five W’s. You had to tell who was going to do what, where, when and why. And if you wrote a letter or directive in the Braun Company telling somebody to do something, and you didn’t tell him why, you could get fired. In fact, you would get fired if you did it twice.
Charlie Munger